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  • Tuition Fee:
  • Local: $ 1.29k / one semester
  • Foreign: $ 1.29k / one semester
  • Languages of instruction:
  • English

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    The Doctoral School of Military Sciences was established in 1996 and focuses on the questions of military science regarding the activities within the defence sphere. This includes a wide spectrum of research fields from military history through security theories, to defence administration and national security.

    Although the doctoral program of the School is primarily based on certain accredited MSc programmes of the National University of Public Service, the law on higher education enables the admission of graduates from other universities and with a scientific background related to military sciences.

    The Doctoral School works in close cooperation with the Ministry of Defence, the Hungarian Defence Forces and with other organizations (e.g. the Hungarian Association of Military Science) that participate in research related to military sciences.
    The international scientific recognition of the Doctoral School can be most easily demonstrated by the fact that the number of foreign students is increasing year after year. In recent years foreign students who have successfully completed their PhD studies have come from countries including France, Italy, the People’s Republic of China, Slovenia, Ukraine and the United States.

    The Doctoral School of Military Sciences focuses on the questions of military science regarding the activities of the defence sphere. This includes a wide spectrum of research fields from military history through security theories, defence administration to national security.

    Although the doctoral programme of the School is primarily based on certain accredited MSc programmes of the National University of Public Service, the law on higher education enables the admission of graduates of other universities and with a scientific background related to military sciences.

    The Doctoral School of Military Sciences focuses on 8 areas of research:
    - Security Studies
    - Sociological Issues of Defence
    - General Theory of Military Science
    - Theory of Defense Management
    - Theory of Military Arts
    - Defence Logistics and Defence Economy
    - National Security and Law Enforcement
    - Defence Informatics and Communication Theory"

    The training of the Doctoral School is available in the following forms:
    • organised training
    - full-time training (funded by scholarship or individually through tuition fee)
    - part-time (funded individually through tuition fee)
    - individual training (funded individually through tuition fee)
    • individual preparation

    In general, the language used in the doctoral training is Hungarian, however, in case of foreign citizens English language training is also available. The training lasts 6 semesters and applies the system of credit points. In order to successfully end their training and receive their leaving certificate (absolutory) by the end of the 6th semester, PhD students must obtain at least 180 credit points in accordance with the following criteria:
    - study obligations (min. 50 credits)
    - scientific research work (min. 120 credits)
    - holding lectures (max. 10 credits)

    The Doctoral School is in close cooperation with the Ministry of Defense, the Hungarian Defense Forces and with other organisations (e.g. the Hungarian Association of Military Science) which participate in researches related to military sciences.
    The international scientific recognition of Doctoral School can be most easily demonstrated by the fact that the number of foreign students is increasing year after year. In recent years foreign students who have successfully ended their PhD studies came from France, Italy, the People’s Republic of China, Slovenia, Ukraine and the United States.


    program_requirements

    (1)  Students enrolled in an organised programme may pursue their studies in organised full-time 
    (funded from scholarship or self-paid) or in organised part-time (self-paid) or in an individual 
    programme.
    13
     
    (2)  In an organised PhD programme, the period available for the fulfilment of the obligations set 
    forth in these Regulations equals up to six semesters, and, in respect of programmes funded from 
    a scholarship, the scholarship will be disbursed for up to six semesters. 
    (3)  The doctoral schools may permit the interruption of a study period on up to three occasions, for 
    a total period of three years (leave of absence for an academic year). The interruption of the 
    student status at one time may exceed two semesters. A student may only interrupt a study 
    programme after the successful completion of the first semester. An application for suspension 
    must be accepted on the first occasion. During the  suspension of the student status, state 
    scholarship may not be disbursed. 
    (4)  The student status is also suspended if the student is unable to fulfil his or her obligations arising 
    from the student status due to childbirth, accident, illness or any other unexpected cause (long-
    time study abroad), through no fault of his or her own. The restrictions described in paragraph 
    (3) do not apply in the cases set forth in this paragraph. The student shall be bound by a 
    notification requirement also in this case. 

    (5)  With regard to all types of PhD programmes, the meeting of the requirements involving work 
    time, set as a precondition for obtaining the doctoral pre-degree certificate must be measured in 
    study points (credits). 
    (6)  An organised programme assists a PhD student in acquiring the knowledge and the individual 
    research experience required for obtaining a PhD degree. To this end, a PhD student participated 
    in academic courses, performs individual research activities and may also undertake lecturing 
    tasks. 
    (7)  A three-year programme consists of six active semesters. Over the course of the programme, at 
    least 180 credits must be obtained in total. In the period of coursework, a PhD student may take 
    up, with no additional tuition fees required, subjects of a credit value exceeding the total number 
    of credit required by 10 per cent. Thus, on completion of the programme, a total of 198 credits 
    may be recognised on his or her part.  
    (8)  The units of a PhD programme, the minimum and expected number of credits that may be 
    obtained in each module, the academic requirements  and those relating to scientific research 
    work and lecturing must be set forth in the academic and examination regulations of doctoral 
    schools (DS AER). 
    (9)  Rules relating to concurrent programmes and foreign studies must be set forth in the academic 
    and examination regulations of doctoral schools. 
     (10) The rules relating to the recognition and accounting of credits obtained by a student enrolled in a 
    PhD programme for subjects taken in the doctoral school of another faculty or institute must be 
    set forth in the academic and examination regulations of doctoral schools. With regard to credit 
    recognition, the provisions of the Diploma and Credit Recognition Regulations of the University 
    must be also applied. 
    (11) The planning and reporting obligations of a PhD student and his or her supervisor, the scheme of 
    testing the knowledge of a PhD student and the order of examination period must be set forth in 
    the academic and examination regulations of doctoral schools, in accordance with the university 
    rules. 
    (12) Each PhD student, with the exception of those individually preparing for the degree, shall 
    possess a statement of acceptance issued by the department that gives lectures and performs 
    research in the given research subject, signed by the head of the given department. 

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